At Play in the Fields of the Lord: Chapters 13-15

15 Mar

In these three chapters, we are treated to an up-close view of the Niaruna, through the lens of Lewis Moon, now Kisu-Mu, some kind of jungle spirit to the Niaruna. I have three questions about these chapters. The first concerns Moon. In an early chapter, he calls himself a “Hollywood Indian,” and even earlier, other native Americans call him a “professional Indian.” Is there something artificial–or at least theatrical–about his descent into the Niaruna camp, and his impersonation of a god? Are there other actions that strike you as overly dramatic about Moon’s behavior in these chapters?

We are introduced to the Niaruna here, whereas before, we only heard about them through the missionaries. As we move from the Niaruna as a single being, a people, to meeting them as individuals, what about them has surprised you? What kind of diversity of personality and motives do you see in this group of people?

Finally, we get to know a fair amount of the Niaruna religion in these pages. How is it different and how is it similar to the religions we are more accustomed to, especially the forms of Christianity practiced by the missionaries?

I’m interested in your answers, especially if they are backed up by specific lines and moments in the chapters.

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101 Responses to “At Play in the Fields of the Lord: Chapters 13-15”

  1. Kelly Daniels March 15, 2013 at 2:27 pm #

    I look forward to hearing from you!

  2. Kelly Daniels March 15, 2013 at 2:29 pm #

    By the way, no need to reply to the picture in my other post…unless you want to.

  3. austinschoeck12 March 15, 2013 at 2:31 pm #

    In regards to the first question, I thought Moon’s descent was a bit overly dramatic. This line in particular seemed a bit odd- “He was filled with rage against this dog, whose outcry tore his nerves; no matter how he chose to meet the Indians, its mindless yapping might weaken the aura of the supernatural that could save his life.” This seemed a bit extreme to me.

    • Elijah Olson March 15, 2013 at 2:35 pm #

      I agree, it was definitely theatrical and overly dramatic. The fact that he came down from a plane ready to crash, hardly strapped into his parachute, making a lucky landing, and then taking the role of a god. It definitely fits his hollywood image.

      • Adam Bengfort March 15, 2013 at 2:37 pm #

        I think it is kind of supposed to be overdramatic. He needed to put everything on the table in order to convince the people to accept him as a higher being.

        • Kristel_E March 15, 2013 at 2:40 pm #

          I agree with Adam. It is a bit overly theatric, but without all of these theatrics, Moon might have been killed or at the very least highly distrusted if his entrance hadn’t been as dramatic as it was.

  4. keelangoettsch11 March 15, 2013 at 2:33 pm #

    For the first question, I thought it was interesting how Moon was so concerned with his first impression that he was hoping that the plane would burst and make a loud noise so they would fear him. He definitely seemed like he wanted the intimidation factor right away so he would be seen as a God

    • Kelly Daniels March 15, 2013 at 2:34 pm #

      Yeah, he wanted a big explosion, like in a Hollywood action film, huh?

      • keelangoettsch11 March 15, 2013 at 2:35 pm #

        Definitely, he wanted his presence known and feared but in a very dramatic way

      • sarahoberg12 March 15, 2013 at 2:36 pm #

        Definitely, and when he gets the loud roar, the narrator states, “He was delighted, like a little boy astonished that his plan has worked” (163).

      • Adam Bengfort March 15, 2013 at 2:39 pm #

        He had to make it know that he was a “big deal.” He needed them to accept him.

      • denabaity March 15, 2013 at 2:54 pm #

        Totally. I didn’t see it that way until just now.

    • mariacatalano March 15, 2013 at 2:37 pm #

      Right, but he wanted to be perceived as a God in order to survive.

      • Kelly Daniels March 15, 2013 at 2:40 pm #

        Yeah, we can’t exactly blame him for not coming clean. They’d almost surely kill him if they knew he was just another white man.

  5. sarahoberg12 March 15, 2013 at 2:34 pm #

    I believe there is something artificial about Moon’s descent into the Niaruna land. He deliberates over certain things he can do and ways to present himself that would make the Niaruna in awe of him. For example, while pondering the position of his parachute he thinks, “the mere sight of the parachute’s great white canopy should insure a respectful welcome; if he comported himself properly, they would have to accept him as some sort of deity” (162).

  6. Joe Wood March 15, 2013 at 2:35 pm #

    As far as the first question, yes, it seems fake or theatrical. Noting:
    “On impulse he threw his arms out wide and scowled vilely at the sun…” (169)
    “He simply did not belong, not here, not anywhere.” (186)

  7. denabaity March 15, 2013 at 2:35 pm #

    Greetings from somewhere on the road between Augie and Lake Zurich!

    I found Moon/Kisu-Mu’s dramatic behavior very interesting in these chapters, starting with how elaborately he plans his entrance into the Niaruna starting on pg 163 (where he thinks about everything from how he should look to what emotions he should portray). I also thought it was interesting how he continues to keep up this “ruse” even with Aeore, who seems to be the most supicious. For whatever reason, I saw him more as joining a place where he fit in than trying to pull one over on the Niaruna. He seemed to do what he had to to not get killed.

    In terms of the Niaruna, I really like them. I like them as characters much more than the Quarriers or Hubens. They are just so interesting, and it’s really cool to see them portrayed as just normal people.

    • sarahoberg12 March 15, 2013 at 2:39 pm #

      I agree with Dena’s comment that it’s interesting to see them as normal people, rather than as intimidating, violent, or just drunk all the time. When Moon first lands and the Niaruna slowly pronounce their names for him, several of them giggle, showing a different side of them. The narrator also uses the word “gently” pretty often to describe their actions, further revealing their softer side!

      • Kelly Daniels March 15, 2013 at 2:42 pm #

        Pindi’s kind of cute, don’t you think? And Tukanu, “the farter” is funny.

    • mariacatalano March 15, 2013 at 2:40 pm #

      I totally agree, he was over-analyzing and dramatizing the situation because he was avoiding death and was generally in a state of panic. Yes he originally wanted to appear as a God, but he descended the panic seemed to get the best of him and began thinking in terms of survival.

  8. Kelly Daniels March 15, 2013 at 2:35 pm #

    I suppose just the whole idea of parachuting into the middle of a village is pretty dang dramatic, like parachuting into the superbowl or something.

    • Elijah Olson March 15, 2013 at 2:41 pm #

      Yeah, except in this case there’s the concern of being killed once you make your landing.

      • mariacatalano March 15, 2013 at 2:46 pm #

        ^yep

  9. Adam Bengfort March 15, 2013 at 2:36 pm #

    I think it is interesting that he is called a professional indian earlier in the novel. This was before he was living among the natives. I feel that he was more a “fake” indian then and now is actually becoming one of the Niaruna.

    • natlam144 March 15, 2013 at 2:39 pm #

      i woud agree with that, i think in the beginning he was more focused on getting them to accept him so that he was not killed, even if it meant lying to them. but now that he has been there longer and has been accepted by the indians, he has really taken the time to study them and learn their customs which has made him just like the rest of them.

      • mariacatalano March 15, 2013 at 2:45 pm #

        I totally agree. He is definitely becoming a part of the Niaruna more than he would have ever anticipated. In response to Adam, I’m with you, it is completely ironic. Another thing to consider that he was being perceived by the missionaries as “fake” which is interesting…

    • sarahoberg12 March 15, 2013 at 2:55 pm #

      I also feel that his title as a “professional indian” was used for intimidation. Since the Niaruna are seen as violent and unpredictable, Moon’s assocation with them adds a scare factor to his image.

      • Adam Bengfort March 15, 2013 at 3:04 pm #

        I think thats a good thought as well. An indian mercenary could be seen as a greater warrior.

    • Kristel_E March 15, 2013 at 3:01 pm #

      I think the term “professional Indian” implies that Moon is acting as an Indian, like a job he is doing or some kind of work he is performing. So I argue that he is less of a professional Indian now, since he is more of a “true” Indian, living their life and participating in their society.

  10. natlam144 March 15, 2013 at 2:37 pm #

    in response to question three;
    they are very scared of offending the spirits. for example, on page 180 it says, “…it was dangerous to sleep with spirits. night and the moon were sacred” they firmly believed that things could happen to them if they did not obey the spirits. again on page 180 it says, “for all pindi knew, kisu-mu might turn himself into anaconda-person, and she would give birth to snakes” so they really believed that if they did not follow the rules of the tribe and disobeyed the spirits, that bad things would happen to them individual or even to the whole tribe.

    • GaryMirrer March 15, 2013 at 2:44 pm #

      It’s just like in Christianity or any religion, devout followers believe that if they disobey their religious laws they will be punished. God’s covenant with Abraham is similar to the Niaruna fearing reparation.

    • Kristel_E March 15, 2013 at 2:46 pm #

      Definitely! I specifically marked that passage because it’s interesting to me how superstitious the Niaruna people are, though that is not uncommon among many different cultures. Their superstitions reflect in their sexual dealings as well as almost every other part of their lives. I’m thinking of the part where the Niaruna discover the radio and think it is a demon and “battle” it. They even marked the spot in warning: “After the battle with the demons, the Indians were leery of the mission, imagining that it was swarmed with vengeful spirits. They left a feathered club of warning and went away,” (176).

      • Kelly Daniels March 15, 2013 at 3:01 pm #

        And yet, the radio kind of seemed like a demon, the way it buzzed and battled. Sybolically, we can actually see the radio as a kind of evil being, bringing western civ and ruin to the indians.

  11. Kelly Daniels March 15, 2013 at 2:37 pm #

    What about Moon’s plan to form a great Indian nation in the jungle? Does that qualify as “dramatic”?

    • sarahoberg12 March 15, 2013 at 2:44 pm #

      I definitely would say that his plan may be dramatic, but I think Moon has seen both the Niaruna and the Missionary sides of the situation and recognizes that both plans are pretty dramatic. The missionaries are entering a completely unknown land and attempting to spread religion into an ungodly place where they are constantly in danger. If they can attempt to have such a strong effect in the jungle, surely the Niaruna, who actually know and are accustomed to the land, can, too.

    • Elijah Olson March 15, 2013 at 2:44 pm #

      I think it does. The idea of changing what they have into a great Indian nation can only be classified as dramatic. It’s a dramatic change to be made in a environment Moon doesn’t fully understand.

    • Joe Wood March 15, 2013 at 2:45 pm #

      It seems to me like nearly everything he tries to do regarding the Niaruna is an attempt to reclaim what he thinks was taken from him and his ancestors. The great nation just looks like another example of that mentality.

    • GaryMirrer March 15, 2013 at 2:46 pm #

      I thought of that being another example of the great foreign savior archetype. It’s a romantic idea but I think that’s all that Moon has known about being an Indian.

    • hilarysteiger12 March 15, 2013 at 2:47 pm #

      I would agree that it does. By forming himself into looking like the Niaruna I think he is trying to play this character in his head

    • mariacatalano March 15, 2013 at 2:55 pm #

      I don’t know if I’m wrong, but I feel like even though Moon originally had all these great ideas, he is quickly assimilating to the Niaruna’s way of life. So yes it was originally dramatic, but like Joe is saying a few comments down, a significant reason Moon even had this idea seems to be a form of redemption. Moon seems to give up on being a God just as he has always given up on fitting in.

  12. Kristel_E March 15, 2013 at 2:38 pm #

    Moon’s descent into the Niaruna camp is arguably purely theatrics. He hopes for, and by some stroke of luck achieves, a specific series of events or almost scenes that occur with his arrival. Specifically the plane exploding shortly after he completed his descent (162). His descent from the sky in itself was theatrical as well. Later, we also see more theatrics from Moon when he throws his arms wide and looks up at the sky. It is so theatrically “godlike”, in fact, that he scares the Niaruna people away. Until Moon became more comfortable with the Niaruna (and even still afterwards), he had to constantly remain “in character” in front of them.

    • natlam144 March 15, 2013 at 2:44 pm #

      i think he is really trying to figure out where he belongs in life. he had never really felt like he fit in anywhere, and now that the indians have accepted him as one of them, he is accepting of where is his now. unfortunately, he did put himself there not being truthful of who he really was and now he really has no choice but to remain in that character he created for himself.

      • mariacatalano March 15, 2013 at 2:59 pm #

        I totally agree with you here. He is searching for a sense of belonging. He kinda backed himself into a corner.

  13. austinschoeck12 March 15, 2013 at 2:38 pm #

    On page 179, when Wolfie sees the Indians & Moon, he just starts firing the plane’s machine gun. This reminded me of an action movie as well.

    • Adam Bengfort March 15, 2013 at 2:42 pm #

      Yeah I hadn’t thought about that but I fully agree. I think it really shows what wolfie’s charater is like as well. He doesn’t really care about the natives and will shoot at them even when they aren’t doing any harm.

    • Kristel_E March 15, 2013 at 2:48 pm #

      Yeah! I actually really liked that scene. I almost feel like Wolfie knew it was Moon and fired the machine gun as some sort of communication to Moon. Maybe I’m totally off base here but it just seems to match the somewhat strange yet close relationship Moon and Wolfie have with each other.

      • Adam Bengfort March 15, 2013 at 2:59 pm #

        I also think it is interesting that the missionaries did not recognize Moon when they first see him with the other natives along the shore of the river. This shows that a setting can really change a person.

    • Brettjohnson11 March 15, 2013 at 2:52 pm #

      I also thought it was interesting that Moon was the only one to shoot an arrow up at Wolfie as he was flying by. It shows how he idolized the bravery that the Indian had who shot an arrow up at him, and seems very theatrical

      • mariacatalano March 15, 2013 at 3:02 pm #

        So true I thought about that too, it was almost a sense of deja vu, maybe he wanted Wolfie to understand the way he felt when the indian shot the arrow at him a few chapters before.

  14. keelangoettsch11 March 15, 2013 at 2:38 pm #

    Moon’s really become more dramatic in general, especially when he’s learning the ways of the Niruana since he’s stil very sensitive to the jungle environment. I thought it was funny how the Niruana were making fun of Moon because he couldn’t walk barefooted or eat lice, etc

  15. GaryMirrer March 15, 2013 at 2:38 pm #

    His only impression of Indians was from the white perspective growing up and I think it’s fitting he cares and finds ways to manipulate how he is seen. It’s like an actor performing for an audience in a play.

    • Adam Bengfort March 15, 2013 at 2:43 pm #

      He really does have to act. I just wonder how long this can go on. It can’t be forever.

      • GaryMirrer March 15, 2013 at 2:45 pm #

        Maybe he finally becomes a real Indian instead of a “professional”.

        • Kristel_E March 15, 2013 at 2:49 pm #

          Isn’t there a saying that goes something like “you can only live a lie so long before it becomes the truth”? It seems like Moon is headed in that direction.

          • mariacatalano March 15, 2013 at 3:04 pm #

            Yes! I’m with you!

      • natlam144 March 15, 2013 at 2:46 pm #

        i’m waiting to see what the indians will do once they figure out what he really is, now that they’ve really accepted him as part of their tribe

        • GaryMirrer March 15, 2013 at 2:50 pm #

          Brett Johnson believes that they will change the man, much like Tom Cruise in The Last Samurai. He will find his way and eventually lead them.

          • Brettjohnson11 March 15, 2013 at 2:53 pm #

            Bingo

        • Kristel_E March 15, 2013 at 2:53 pm #

          That part almost seems theatrical too, like in most movies where someone is lying and the audience is kind of on pins and needles until the lie is uncovered.

        • Joe Wood March 15, 2013 at 2:56 pm #

          At this point, I’m not so sure that they would even care.

  16. austinschoeck12 March 15, 2013 at 2:41 pm #

    On page 180, Moon and Pindi have sex as the kids cheer them on. After they are done, the kids urge them to do more because they enjoyed watching. This was very over-the-top and theatrical.

    • Kristel_E March 15, 2013 at 2:57 pm #

      I guess I could see it as theatrical because it was certainly a performance and not simply having sex since people were watching. But at the same time, Moon kept shooing the kids away; he didn’t want to make something theatrical out of his sex life. I find that interesting; almost like he is trying to keep one part of his life away from everyone’s scrutiny…though he is unsuccessful.

    • sarahoberg12 March 15, 2013 at 2:58 pm #

      I feel like this also shows his acceptance into the community. I know the marriage relations in the community are pretty loose and Pindi is said to be pretty all over the place with the men, but Moon is still an outsider, so I feel like Pindi openly having sex with him shows that the Niaruna think of him as one of their own.

      • Kristel_E March 15, 2013 at 3:04 pm #

        This is true. It seems like the fact that he is having sex with Pindi and people are cheering them on is showing that Moon has been accepted into their society. One would think that he would be killed or imprisoned in some way for rape if the Niaruna disagreed with this.

  17. jessicaandujar11 March 15, 2013 at 2:41 pm #

    I agree. It’s really interesting to see him become one of them like on page 169 “Marai-wuta! He beat himself upon the chest. Mori! Mori!”

  18. michaelhoover12 March 15, 2013 at 2:43 pm #

    I think that Moon likes to think he is humble and below other people, but the truth is he seems to think he’s a great person, and he hates himself for it. He’s the kind of guy who would stand out in the rain feeling sorry for himself and hoping that someone sees him. I don’t think he’s being an ass about it, but he’s just simultaneously insecure and egotistical.

    • Adam Bengfort March 15, 2013 at 2:45 pm #

      He does seem to have a high opinion of himself. Earlier in the story he feels that he need to care for Wolfie and now he is showing himself as a god.

      • Brettjohnson11 March 15, 2013 at 3:01 pm #

        It is almost as if he is beginning to believe his own lies, and is holding himself accountable to have these god-like assets

  19. keelangoettsch11 March 15, 2013 at 2:44 pm #

    Moon definitely has an identity crisis throught this book and I think he’s now found where he wants to start over and commit himself. The fact that he’s learned practically their whole language in this time and was even inducted into their group shows how he has become one of them.

    • Adam Bengfort March 15, 2013 at 2:47 pm #

      I do agree that this is a new start in his life but I don’t know if he truely wants to live there forever. And even if he does, i do not believe that he will be able to impersonate a god for his entire life.

    • sarahoberg12 March 15, 2013 at 2:48 pm #

      I agree that he definitely wants to become one of the Niaruna, and is not simply adapting to their way of life. Some effort and attention would definitely have to be contributed in order to learn a language that quickly. I think it’s also funny how he could point out Leslie Huben’s translation mistakes and correct them after such a short amount of time. That reveals that Moon not only knows the language, but knows its context and its colloquial usage in the community.

    • Elijah Olson March 15, 2013 at 2:53 pm #

      I agree, he even implies that he is now Kisu-Mu, rather than Moon. He definitely considers himself part of them.

      • natlam144 March 15, 2013 at 3:04 pm #

        yeah on page 186, he says, “seeing a savage in blue neckerchief and khakis, the missionaries would be certain that lewis moon was dead. and so he was”. this right here shows that he completely left lewis moon behind and has now become kisu-mu

  20. Nick Clark March 15, 2013 at 2:45 pm #

    I know this was hinted at before, but I also thought it was intruiging that the Niaruna separated into factions while Moon was there. For me, this really emphasized their human qualities rather than the mindless mob that people like Leslie Huben have made them out to be.

  21. Kelly Daniels March 15, 2013 at 2:46 pm #

    How about their conception of “god” or in their case, “gods” as compared to the all mighty Christian God (who actually has three manifestations, plus all the popes and saints and stuff in Catholicism)?

    • Adam Bengfort March 15, 2013 at 2:48 pm #

      I think part of this belief they have makes it easier for moon to join them. He doesn’t have to be The God just one of the many lesser spirits.

    • keelangoettsch11 March 15, 2013 at 2:49 pm #

      Yeah, the Niruana seem to have the view of multiple dieties that pertain to each season/weather, so they will pray to them for hope of good weather/food but also they feel scared or warned when bad things happen -such as the flooding of the jungle

    • Nick Clark March 15, 2013 at 2:50 pm #

      I found this point especially interesting about the Niaruna. Tukanu mentions that the missionaries tried to explain the Christian God in terms of the Niaruna’s “ultimate” god, and ended up picking an inferior god in the process. But the Niaruna also mention how their greatest god is also indifferent to the affairs of man, and not worth revering – which is totally unlike the Christian idea of God.

      • Kelly Daniels March 15, 2013 at 2:52 pm #

        Yeah, that last point, about the bigger the god the less relevant it is. Like the difference between talking to your city mayor and writing a letter to the president. Much more likely to get a result from the former.

        • keelangoettsch11 March 15, 2013 at 2:54 pm #

          That’s interesting to put it in those terms, but it does make more sense. Why pray to one all mighty God who has to look over everything and everyone when instead if you have a specific problem you can pray to that particular God.

        • natlam144 March 15, 2013 at 2:54 pm #

          that’s what i thought of reading that. i agree with nick though that christians idea is more focused on the “greatest god” instead of the ones easiest to get to.

    • hilarysteiger12 March 15, 2013 at 2:54 pm #

      It seems to me that they believe in more spirits than “one” God. They do however believe in a creator from the sky but say its a waste of time on spirits so remote. To me this is interesting that like Christians they also refer to the sky like Christians would to Heaven and secondly they believe in a creator like Christians do. Those are similarities of both religions that I connected.

  22. austinschoeck12 March 15, 2013 at 2:47 pm #

    “It was like being born all over again”, Moon could completely remake himself as one of the Natives. It seems like he might be starting to solve his identity crisis.

    • Kelly Daniels March 15, 2013 at 2:48 pm #

      Yeah, that also has an echo of “born again Christian,” at last to me.

      • sarahoberg12 March 15, 2013 at 3:01 pm #

        I think there is also an aspect of eternal forgiveness present, similar to some Christian religions, considering Moon was initially going to kill the Niaruna and now has become one of them.

  23. austinschoeck12 March 15, 2013 at 2:48 pm #

    In a way, the Indian shamans remind me of Christian priests because of their roles in the community and ability to speak to the gods.

    • Adam Bengfort March 15, 2013 at 2:53 pm #

      They are spiritual leaders just as priests are. However, they do not claim to turn into jaguars. Having said this, Priests are supposedly to forgive sins through God which could also be seen as supernatural.

  24. Kelly Daniels March 15, 2013 at 2:53 pm #

    The Niaruna religion seems more practical, more rooted in the world than most western religions. As Moon puts it, the line between the sacred and profane is blurred with the Indians.

  25. michaelhoover12 March 15, 2013 at 2:54 pm #

    Aeore’s suspicion of Moon reminds me of Grizzly Man. In that documentary, there was a single bear that didn’t like the guy, and he correctly predicted that if he were to be killed by any of the bears, it would be that specific bear. He was killed and eaten. I really doubt that Aeore will stay tolerant of Kisu-Mu for much longer. It doesn’t seem to fit with the nature of the story.

  26. Nick Clark March 15, 2013 at 2:55 pm #

    In regard to Moon, though, I agree with many of these previous comments in that Moon is certainly going through an identity crisis. What I find to be real evidence of this is his new plan to create a great nation under his leadership. In other words, he wants to “create a place where he belongs” and make his mark on history. Even if it’s just a pipe dream, it is a very real possibility for Moon, who is obviously desperate to find a purpose.

    • Kelly Daniels March 15, 2013 at 2:57 pm #

      There’s something of a Napoleon thing going on, isn’t there? His ambition is huge.

      • keelangoettsch11 March 15, 2013 at 3:00 pm #

        Moon feels like he’s the leader since he came from a civilized community and that he knows better. Although he’s learned the ways of the Niruana, I still think Moon believes he’s above them, thus he can control them and create this new nation. It would benefit all the Indians but it might not happen in the way they want it to

    • Elijah Olson March 15, 2013 at 2:58 pm #

      Exactly. It seems he is going so far to become someone he is happy with, that he will throw away his old self, by becoming a part of this tribe.

  27. austinschoeck12 March 15, 2013 at 2:57 pm #

    The fact that the Indians believe that their gods can walk among them is also very different than western religions.

    • Elijah Olson March 15, 2013 at 3:00 pm #

      Well I think that’s because the Indians are much more spiritual compared to us in the western world. They thank their gods for everything they have, while we in the western world take things for granted.

      • sarahoberg12 March 15, 2013 at 3:04 pm #

        I agree, and the Indians are also much more connected to the natural environment and the world their gods rule. In the western world, we are so disconnected from the natural world and creation with technology and things like that. I think for them, having the gods walk among them is natural.

  28. jessicaandujar11 March 15, 2013 at 3:00 pm #

    I kind of think his living among the niaruna is somewhat of a redemption for him as well considering he feels some type of guilt about his past

  29. hilarysteiger12 March 15, 2013 at 3:00 pm #

    In answer to the second question I was surprised that the Niarunas weren’t as they have been portrayed to be as dangerous and lazy Indians. I would describe them more accepting and traditional then others described them in previous chapters.

    • Elijah Olson March 15, 2013 at 3:02 pm #

      Well that’s because they are described that way by the men on the outside that don’t truly know what goes on inside the tribe.

  30. Kelly Daniels March 15, 2013 at 3:02 pm #

    Great conversation! I’ll check after class in case I missed something you wrote. Now I’m going to pack up and head toward class. See you in about fifteen minutes.

  31. austinschoeck12 March 15, 2013 at 3:04 pm #

    2. I was surprised at how outspoken Aeore is. I assumed Borani would have absolute power, but it doesn’t seem that way.

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